The Norwegian Human Rights Fund

The Norwegian Human Rights Fund (NHRF) works to protect and promote human rights internationally through direct support to organisations working in the first line of defence for human rights.

Norway’s efforts to support human rights defenders Guide for the foreign service

The protection of human rights is one of the main pillars of Norwegian foreign policy, and providing support for human rights defenders is a central part of these efforts. The objective is that efforts to promote and defend human rights in all parts of the world can be carried out without restrictions or threats to human rights defenders or their families. Human rights defenders are peopl

Queer World

Queer World is a Norwegian interest organization for LGBTQ+ individuals with minority backgrounds. The organisation is an independent, non-religious, and non-partisan organization that works diligently towards a society where everyone, regardless of their ethnic or religious background, can freely express their sexual orientation, gender identity, or gender expression without experiencing discrimination.

Association for Gender and Sexual Diversity FRI

FRI is an LGBTQ+ advocacy organization in Norway that works to promote equality, rights, and acceptance for LGBTQ+ individuals.

Predictors of acculturative hassles among Vietnamese refugees in Norway: Results from a long-term longitudinal study

The article suggests that addressing psychological distress during the early phase in a resettlement country may promote long-term refugee adjustment and reduce exposure to acculturative hassles.

Realizing Refugees’ Right to Family Unity:The challenges to family reunification in Norway, Sweden and Denmark

Policies regarding family reunification have become increasingly strict over the last years, especially after the influx of asylum applications that all Scandinavian countries received in the summer and autumn of 2015. Shortly after, the number of asylum applications rapidly decreased, while the number of family reunification applications have continued to increase in recent years. The report, commissioned by UNHCR, is a comparative legal study of the legal framework, policies and practice pertaining to the family reunification procedure in Norway, Sweden and Denmark.

LAST NED HÅNDBOKEN

LAST NED HÅNDBOKEN
I samarbeid med fagpersoner innenfor psykisk helsevern utviklet denne håndboken beregnet for hjelpere om kultursensitiv psykososial hjelp til gutter og menn som oppholder seg i Norge som asylsøkere, flyktninger og andre sårbare grupper, og som har overlevd seksuell vold i forbindelse med krig og flukt. Mange av disse faller utenfor det etablerte helsevesenet der det er naturlig å få hjelp for denne problematikken. Det finnes i dag ingen spesialisert form for hjelp eller tiltak beregnet på denne gruppen, og det er også mangel på kunnskap om hjelpebehovet, noe som innebærer begrenset tilgang på tiltak også innenfor det ordinære hjelpeapparatet. Dette er situasjonen i Norge i dag til tross for at omfanget av slike overgrepserfaringer er stort og konsekvensene for den psykiske helsen er alvorlige.

Conversation with Betsy Kawamura and Dr. Henrik Syse on Women Peace and Security in North Asia

Betsy Kawamura, founder of Women4NonViolence https://www.w4nv.com dialogues with Dr. Henrik Syse of PRIO and co-editor of “Journal of Military Ethics” about Women Peace and Security (WPS) in North Asia (Okinawa, Japan and the Korean Peninsula). Topics include the Battle of Okinawa, North Korean refugee women, the Status of Force Agreement SOFA, the Recreation and Amusement Association https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Recreat…. Bkawamura10@hotmail.com
Henrik Syse, PhD Research Professor, Peace Research Institute Oslo (PRIO) / Professor of Peace and Conflict Studies, Björknes University College / Editor, Journal of Military Ethics /Freelance lecturer / Member of the Norwegian Nobel Committee 2015 – 2020 Email: Syse@Prio.org Journal of Military Ethics:
https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/1…
Below are the basic questions asked by Dr. Syse in this dialog 
(1) You are truly engaged with the WPS agenda, not least wishing to expand consciousness about that agenda in North-East Asia. Why? Where does your engagement come from?
(2) You are preoccupied with history, and you tell me that some articles from the Journal of Military Ethics, which I co-edit, including one on war crimes at Okinawa during and
after WW II, have been important to you. What’s the importance of history in addressing WPS concerns today?
(3) You want to reach out to military audiences. Do you think there is enough attention to sexualized violence and WPS more broadly among military personnel today? If not, what can be done to rectify that?
(4) Looking at your own path ahead, as an activist and as someone who knows this terrain well, what do you think are the most important next steps? And who do you need to work with in order to realize those steps?

The Human Aspect

Learn from hundreds of people from around the world, that has opened-up and been vulnerable so that you can connect, in the world’s first life experience library. Search through and explore now and you will find hundreds of in-dept video interviews evolving around the raw answers to these 3 questions:
1. What has been your life’s toughest challenge?
2. How did you overcome it?
3. What have you learned?.
Particularly relevant for MHHRI is the collection of interviews with people who have experienced war and conflict – https://thehumanaspect.com/?category=War%20%26%20conflict#feed

Consideration of reports submitted by States parties under article 19 of the Convention pursuant to the optional reporting procedure, Eighth periodic report of States parties due in 2016 : Norway

“The report deals with the changes in legislation and legal and administrative practice relating to the individual material provisions of the Convention that have been made since the Government of Norway submitted its combined sixth and seventh report (CAT/C/NOR/Q/7), with a reference to the list of issues adopted by the Committee at its 52nd session (CAT/C/NOR/QPR8), in accordance with the new optional reporting procedures established by the Committee at its 38th session.”

The Norwegian Human Rights Fund

The Norwegian Human Rights Fund (NHRF) works to protect and promote human rights internationally through direct support to organisations working in the first line of defence for human rights.

The NHRF aims to be a flexible, courageous and global actor that provides direct support to local organisations working for the rights of vulnerable and marginalised individuals and groups. In many cases, the NHRF supports affected communities and people on the ground in mobilising and taking the lead in the struggle for their rights.

“The GBV training manual is a response to the urgent need for psychological care”

In the work of making resources on mental health more easily available to professionals and others working with people exposed to human rights violations in disaster, war and conflict, Health and Human Rights Info (HHRI) has received contributions and support from a large group of people. Since its beginning in the early 2000s, psychologists and psychiatrists and other professionals working in different contexts around the world have been involved in ensuring that the material in the database may be of use in the field and has a good ethical and professional standard.

Concluding observations of the Committee against Torture: Norway. 2012

Concluding observations on the combined sixth and seventh periodic reports of Norway, adopted by the Committee at its forty-ninth session (29 October to 23 November 2012). It conformed fully with the requirements laid down in the Committee`s reporting guidelines. It provided information, article by article, on new measures to implement the Convention taken since the submission of its last report and answered questions raised during the discussion of the fourth periodic report. The Committee also thanks the delegation for its oral information and its frank and precise replies to the questions raised by members of the Committee.

Children and War Foundation

The Children and War Foundation has been created to ensure that more solid knowledge about children can be gathered, and then used to improve the care of all children affected by war and disaster. Two professional groups, the Center for Crisis Psychology in Bergen, Norway and the Institute of Psychiatry in London, UK, have been instrumental in setting up this foundation.

Center for Crisis Psychology (CCP)

Center for Crisis Psychology (CCP) is a Norwegian center specialized in the effects of traumas and losses on children and adults. The center has established close collaboration with a number of international resource centers and institutions, and this new internet service will provide information from the international activities of CCP and partners in different parts of the world.

Concluding observations of the Committee against Torture : Norway

The fifth periodic report of Norway was submitted on 5 February 2008. It conformed fully with the requirements laid down in the Committee`s reporting guidelines. It provided information, article by article, on new measures to implement the Convention taken since the submission of its last report and answered questions raised during the discussion of the fourth periodic report. The Committee also thanks the delegation for its oral information and its frank and precise replies to the questions raised by members of the Committee.